Emiliano's Pompeii and other archaeological tours

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The Doryphoros of Polykleitos at the Archaeological Museum of Naples

The statue represents the spear-bearer. This statue is located at the Archaeological Museum of Naples and it is one of the best copies we receive from history. T

he original statue was executed in bronze by Polykleitos around 440 BC with the purpose to represent the ideal of harmony of the greek man, kalòs Kai agathòs (physically beautiful and intelligent).

The beauty of a body born from the exact proportion of all its parts.
The perfect anatomy of the figure follows a rhythm between tenance and flexing of the muscles, giving a shape reminiscent of the X, the letter chi in greek language.

This marble copy was found in Pompeii in the Samnite Gym , a building built in the second century BC This building was probably the seat of youth associations in which it recognized the heroic characteristics to mythical figures such as Achilles.

Pliny wrote: “..once the statues were dressed with a toga, but then liked the naked statue leading a spear that resembles that of the Efebi located in the gymnasiums, called Achilee …” (Pliny, Naturalis Historia, 34,10,84)

The spear was probably a javelin called akòntion.

The races javelin looked  like the exercises of war and hunting.

This sculpture seems to epitomize the ideal male human form. All of the body parts seem perfectly proportioned and the muscles are beautifully defined as if the image were of an athlete. The image is youthful with a calm demeanor. The right missing forearm looks as if it used to be resting at his side, while the left elbow was probably at a 90 degree angle, with the hand holding something. The slight bend in the left leg gives the impression of movement, as if the image was frozen while walking. The counterpoised stance adds an air of nobility to the "man".

This sculpture seems to epitomize the ideal male human form. All of the body parts seem perfectly proportioned and the muscles are beautifully defined as if the image were of an athlete. The image is youthful with a calm demeanor. The right missing forearm looks as if it used to be resting at his side, while the left elbow was probably at a 90 degree angle, with the hand holding something. The slight bend in the left leg gives the impression of movement, as if the image was frozen while walking. The counterpoised stance adds an air of nobility to the “man”.

the Doriforo

The Doryphoros, Archaeological Museum of Naples, from Palestra Sannitica, Pompeii

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For your tour:

info@pompeiin.com

tel. +39 3284134719

Skype: Archeoemy

Information and advice for visiting Pompeii

scavi pompei turisti 08 0048_Public_Notizie_270_470_3

Entrance

Porta Marina (Marina Gate) – Piazza Esedra (Esedra Square) – Piazza Anfiteatro (Amphitheater Square)

Opening times
The Pompeii archeological site is open dailyApr–Oct 8:30am to 7:30pm, Nov–Mar 8:30am–5pm.
The last entry is 90 minutes before closing.

How to get to Pompeii
By train
Marina Gate and Esedra square:
From Naples, take the half-hourly local Circumvesuviana train toward Sorrento and get off at “Pompei Scavi-Villa dei Misteri” (27–40 min.)

Amphitheater Square:

Circumvesuviana Naples-Poggiomarino (stop Pompei Santuario)
State Rayilway Naples – Salerno (stop Pompei)

By Bus:
SITA from Naples and Salerno
CSTP n.4 from Salerno
CSTP n 50 from Salerno (by highway)

By car:
Highway A3 Naples-Salerno (exit Pompei ovest)

Tickets
Pompeii
Full € 11,00
Reduced € 5,50 (*)

With access to sites 5 (Pompeii, Herculaneum and Oplontis, Stabia, Antiquarium of Boscoreale – validity 3 days)
Full: € 20.00
Reduced: € 10.00 (*)

(Oplontis, Stabia and Antiquarium of Boscoreale) 
Full: € 5.50 
Reduced: € 2.75 (*)

Free for EU citizens under 18 years or over 65 years
(*) Reduced: for EU citizens aged between 18 and 24 years of age and for teachers of the European Union.
The free tickets and reduced can be issued only upon presentation of a valid identity document.

A useful service cloakroom is active at the entrances where you can also leave your luggage.
Inside the excavations there is a refreshment point equipped with bar and self-service.
For the schools the reservation is mandatory.

Walking tour at Pompeii along "Via dell'Abbondanza"

Walking tour at Pompeii with Emiliano along “Via dell’Abbondanza”

How much time does it take to visit pompeii?

Pompeii is an entire city and to visit it would take a full day, but to have an “idea” of the ancient city, is necessary you will be spending at least 2 hours inside the ancient city of Pompeii excavation site, that’s the minimum you need to experience the site and get an idea of what it’s all about.

For this reason, you have to contact an experienced guide who will be able to show you the highlights according to the time at your disposal.        

General Tips:

> Bring bottled water, a hat with a brim, and sun block—it’s hard to escape the sun at Pompeii, and the dust is everywhere.

> Wear comfortable shoes

>Use the toilet before you enter the site, there are some at the main entrance. Once you enter the ruins, there is only one close to the main entrance and that’s about it. You don’t want to walk for 15 minutes from one side of Pompeii ruins to the other side when you really need to go!
>Photographs and filming are authorized for private use
>Smoking is not permitted
>Pets are not allowed on the site

 

 

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For your tour:

info@pompeiin.com

tel. +39 3284134719

Skype: Archeoemy

Wall painting in Pompeii

Pompeian styleThe first scholar to classify the Pompeian painting was the German archaeologist August Mau that stood out in four styles.

The FIRST STYLE, referring to the period from III to I century BC, of Greek origin, structural style or fouling, was an imitation of stucco, often in relief, a technique called opus quadratum, used to coat the marbles exterior walls of public buildings and religious in the Doric style. In the House of the Faun in Pompeii and in the Samnite House in Herculaneum are significant examples of this style.

I style - Herculaneum

I style – Herculaneum

The SECOND STYLE, called architectural style and described in detail by Vitruvius, was introduced in the I century BC, and reworking some elements of the earlier style. Inspired by the scenery of the Hellenistic-Roman theater, distributed in a bottom-shaped podium, on which rested in the middle of the faux wall structures, columns, niches, with characters represented megalografie-size or scale to a slightly more small, floral elements and animals, and seen in perspective with illusionistic realism final effect of a trompe l’oeil. Examples of the second style is found in the triclinium of the Villa Oplonti, in the Villa of the Mysteries, and in the frescoes from the Villa of Boscoreale, now housed at the Metropolitan Museum in New York and the Archaeological Museum of Naples.

2 style_Casa_di_Augusto3

II style – Augustus House

Over the last years of the century B.C. under the principate of Augustus with the THIRD STYLE, called Pompeian style or ornamentation, takes over the decorative. The optical illusion disappears, replaced by solid funding, usually in black, red or white, with a central miniature paintings depicting scenes of various kinds, mostly mythological, enclosed in kiosks or squares said pinakes. The walls were designed as split levels a lower base, divided by the median, through a dais decorated various ornaments. Typical were the candlesticks, the plant shoots and thyrsus. Some of the finest examples of the third style can be seen in the House of the Vetti and in the House of Lucretius Fronto.

III style_Fresco-Boscotrecase

From the age Claudia develops the FOURTH STYLE, defined fantastic style, in its first phase sees the return of the architectural elements of the second style, recreated amazing sleight of type. Scenes of heroic character-mythological and allegorical figures, painted with warmer colors representing the elements and accessories in yellow gold. In the Flavian period, so in the last years of the city of Pompeii, appear real scenes and great landscapes. It ‘s the most popular decoration in the Vesuvius area, since many houses were redecorated after the violent earthquake of 62 AD. C. The House of the Tragic Poet, one of the Vetti and Menander in Pompeii, Shrine of the Augustans and the House of the Stags at Herculaneum have some of the finest examples of decorations in the fourth style.

IV style_Herculaneum-Palestra

IV style – Herculaneum Gymnasium

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Contact us for a tour:

info@pompeiin.com

tel. +39 3284134719

The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79AD

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Findings from the archaeological and stratigraphic surveys on materials deposited during the eruption od Vesuvius in 79 AD compared with Pliny the Younger’s description of the event to Tacitus have shed light on the progression of consequences for people and things during the development of the eruptive event.

On the mooring of 24 August 79 AD, a sudden tremor abruptly interrupted the daily routine of the inhabitants of Pompeii, This was followed shortly afterwards by a tremendous blast signaling the beginning of a violent eruption with a column of lapilli rising over 20,000 meters onto the sky. Carried by the wind, this cloud of lapilli hailed down upon Pompeii, submerging the city in just a few hours in some three meters of material. The roofs of many houses caved in under the weight, often crushing and killing those who had taken refuge within. But the worst was yet to come. At dawn of the following day, the first pyroclastic flow, composed of hot gas and fine ash, hit Pompeii and sealed the fate of every person and animal it encountered. The burning ash clogged the lungs and caused death by suffocation. Shortly thereafter, when already no living thing was left in the city, a second flow, much more powerful than first, fell with fury upon the walls of the town toppling or sweeping away their upper portions. It has been calculated that this pyroclastic flow was probably travelling at speed of between 65 and 80 kilometers per hour as it engulfed and carried off objects, roofing tiles and even the bodies of the dead Pompeians. Other surges hit Pompeii in waves after the city had already been destroyed. In the end, Pompeii was left buried under 5-6 meters of ash and lapilli in a desolate grey landscape whose only features were a few protruding walls.

Eruption of Vesuvius

Reconstruction fo the eruption

CONTACTS:

info@pompeiin.com

+39 3284134719

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